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Symposium 2017 has ended
Symposium 2017: Scholarly Teaching & Learning in Post-Secondary Education is now over. Visit the Symposium 2017 archives to view video of Dr. Nancy Chick’s keynote presentation, photos, slide presentations, and more.

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Monday, November 6
 

08:00 PST

Breakfast
Monday November 6, 2017 08:00 - 09:00 PST
TBA

09:00 PST

Opening Remarks
  • Welcome!
  • Indigenous Territory Acknowledgment by Elder Margaret George
  • Opening Remarks by BCTLC Co-Chairs, Maureen Wideman & Theresa Southam

Monday November 6, 2017 09:00 - 09:10 PST
Fletcher Challenge Theatre (cap. 200)

09:10 PST

Keynote: Dr. Nancy Chick

Scholarly Teaching to SoTL:  Exploring the Shared "S" 

We know from Shulman (2004), Richlin and Cox (2004), Allen and Field (2005), Potter and Kustra (2011), and others than scholarly teaching is seen as a goal for all who teach, and is typically distinguished from the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL), which is found at the other, peer-reviewed, public end of a spectrum.  What does this distinction mean--for all who teach, for those who SoTL, and for our students? 


Speakers
avatar for Dr. Nancy Chick

Dr. Nancy Chick

University Chair in Teaching and Learning, University of Calgary
Nancy Chick is Academic Director of the Taylor Institute for Teaching and Learning and University Chair of Teaching and Learning at the University of Calgary. She is also founding co-editor of Teaching & Learning Inquiry, the journal of the International Society for the Scholarship... Read More →



Monday November 6, 2017 09:10 - 10:05 PST
Fletcher Challenge Theatre (cap. 200)

10:00 PST

Break
Monday November 6, 2017 10:00 - 10:15 PST
TBA

10:15 PST

How Dramatic! Implementing a Pan-Discipline Protocol for Developing Critical Role Plays
Role plays are not new activities.  Many professional fields such as nursing (Jenkins & Turick-Gibson, 1999) use these techniques extensively.  Language classrooms are also common places to find the implementation of role plays and simulations (Larocque, 1986; Piper, 1984).  While role plays are enjoying a renewed legitimacy in student-centred classrooms, there is little evidence in the research of the significant effect these techniques can have in teaching and learning.

Speakers
avatar for Karen Densky

Karen Densky

Associate Teaching Professor/TESL Coordinator Faculty of Education and Social Work, Thompson Rivers University
Karen Densky holds a PhD in Education in Curriculum Theory and Implementation (Simon Fraser University) and an MA in Education in Curriculum and Instruction (Simon Fraser University). Her teaching areas are in English language and teacher education. Karen’s research areas include... Read More →


Monday November 6, 2017 10:15 - 11:05 PST
Segal Room 1420

10:15 PST

Using Card Sorting as a Tool to Measure Student Cognition
The Science One Program is a first-year interdisciplinary science experience offered at the University of British Columbia. “Big picture” scientific concepts are presented in an integrated and interdisciplinary format using first-year biology, chemistry, mathematics and physics.  While there is increasing interest in such interdisciplinary science programs, there is a lack of documented research in interdisciplinary teaching and learning, making the evaluation of student learning and program effectiveness difficult. Our work has been guided by two fundamental research questions:

 

1. Do Science One students “think differently” than general science students?

2. Are they more readily able to transfer knowledge across disciplinary boundaries? If so, can we measure it?

 

Previously, card sorting has been used to distinguish expert and novice thinking in physics (Chi, 1981), biology (Smith, 2013) and chemistry (Krieter, 2016).  We have extended this method to develop a novel card sorting instrument that measures interdisciplinary cognition.  In our instrument, students are asked to sort nine disciplinary problems (3 each from biology, chemistry and physics).  There are two hypothesized sorts:  One involving surface features (disciplines from which the question were derived), and another involving deep features (underlying interdisciplinary topics).  The manner in which cards are sorted provides insight into student cognition.

 

During our session, we will show that participating in an interdisciplinary science program yields a greater ability to identify the underlying interdisciplinary linkages between these problems, suggesting enhanced interdisciplinary cognition.  We will also discuss how card sort activities are a versatile method for measuring student knowledge categorization in many situations.

 

 

Speakers
CA

Chris Addison

Associate Professor of Teaching, University of British Columbia
POSTER TITLE: Assessing Interdisciplinary Thinking Using a Card Sort ActivityTHEME: Educational tools and interventions
avatar for James Charbonneau

James Charbonneau

Assistant Professor of Teaching, University of British Columbia
I'm an Instructor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at UBC and the Associate Director the Science Gateway Programs, which includes Science One and the Coordinated Science Program. I spend most of my time either teaching or thinking about teaching.


Monday November 6, 2017 10:15 - 11:05 PST
Fletcher Challenge Theatre (cap. 200)

10:15 PST

Changing the Way We Teach Teams
The demand for innovation in the context of a globalized workforce has raised the importance of developing collaborative skills and increased the challenges of managing workplace diversity. Knowing how to collaborate effectively is an essential skill for business and other types of work environments (Conference Board of Canada, nd. Retrieved December 10, 2016,). Given this, many post-secondary programs have introduced courses in their curricular or co-curricular streams to address these needs. Developing such courses to teach students these skills can be challenging, exciting, and transformational – for both the student and the educator. 

In response to feedback from employers and surveys of both domestic and international students, our business school developed a course for new students in our undergraduate program to learn how to collaborate effectively in diverse teams. We crossed limitations that can often exist in higher education by teaching skills often not addressed until upper-level courses. In doing so we better prepare students for working with diverse groups to achieve a common goal – both within the university context and as they prepare and enter the workforce. 

In this session, participants will generate ideas, questions, and suggestions for developing a 100-200 level course to transform how students work with others and utilize diversity in teams. After this activity, participants will hear about the design challenges we have had to overcome and the areas where we continue to learn.

This session will appeal to educators (curricular and co-curricular) currently designing or delivering learning experiences to teach teamwork. 

Speakers
avatar for Shauna Jones

Shauna Jones

Senior Lecturer, Simon Fraser University
Senior Lecturer Shauna Jones, holds a MA in Leadership and teaches Business Communication and Foundations in Collaborative Work Environments for the Beedie School of Business. She brings with her almost two decades of experience in business and personal consulting, facilitation and... Read More →



Monday November 6, 2017 10:15 - 11:05 PST
Segal Room 1430

10:15 PST

Encouraging Folio-Thinking: Capturing the Learning with e-Portfolio
University of the Fraser Valley recently implemented an ePortfolio program requirement into the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of General Studies degrees. This curriculum change is being implemented through courses designed to guide students through the process of portfolio development, reflection and assessment. To support this initiative UFV faculty required professional development around ePortfolio and how to successfully integrate this high impact practice into their teaching practice. This professional development included a Folio-Thinking Workshop which addressed concepts around artifacts, reflection, identity and audience. The Folio-Thinking Workshop has been adapted by the presenters to be delivered in the classroom as an engaging introduction to ePortfolio through a collaborative exercise that addresses the structure of ePortfolio and associated theory. This successful classroom activity can be used in any setting where ePortfolio is used as an assessment tool or modified to support the implementation of any high impact practice in the classroom. In the proposed workshop, participants will take part in a collaborative brainstorming activity that identifies ePortfolio artifacts, ways to reflect on those artifacts, and how personal identity can be incorporated into the final portfolio. The learning is captured in a collaborative folio-thinking artifact wall.

Speakers
avatar for Claire Hay

Claire Hay

Faculty Developer, University of the Fraser Valley
avatar for Michelle Johnson

Michelle Johnson

Educational Developer, University of the Fraser Valley
Michelle Johnson is an Educational Developer and part of the Teaching and Learning team at the University of the Fraser Valley. She has a background in Graphic Design and customer service. She is currently working towards two goals: a Masters in Learning and Technology and the implementation... Read More →
avatar for Mary Gene Saudelli

Mary Gene Saudelli

Faculty, Teaching and Learning, University of the Fraser Valley
International and Indigenous higher education, curriculum, interdisciplinary studies, learning and teaching approaches, Scholarship of Teaching and Learning



Monday November 6, 2017 10:15 - 11:05 PST
Segal Room 1410

10:15 PST

Indigenous Learning Circles for Faculty: Weaving New Ways of Learning across Classrooms
Recent reforms at many Canadian institutions have led some of us to challenge the dominance of Western epistemologies in higher education and consider the ways in which Indigenous ways of knowing can be integrated more meaningfully into our classrooms (Augustus, 2015). Vancouver Island University (VIU) has adopted an institution-wide framework to address the challenge of reconciliation, as required by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, between Canada’s Indigenous peoples and non-Indigenous peoples. As part of this initiative, VIU’s Centre for Innovation and Excellence in Learning recently partnered with the Office of Aboriginal Education and Engagement to facilitate learning circles for faculty. These professional learning opportunities bring together Elders-In-Residence, Aboriginal students and VIU faculty to explore ‘indigenization’ in higher education and the impact it has on all of us. 

In this session, we will provide three perspectives on participating in the learning circles. A faculty member, Marilyn Funk, two students, Aaron Moore and Sheldon Scow and an educational developer, Kathleen Bortolin will all share how participating in this this full-year initiative impacted their practices and their perspective on indigenous teaching and learning in higher education. Their learning journeys share a common theme around experiencing the lingering impact of colonization in ourselves and in our classrooms, and the ways in which we are moving forward and learning together.

Speakers
avatar for Kathleen Bortolin

Kathleen Bortolin

Curriculum, Teaching and Learning Specialist, Vancouver Island University


Monday November 6, 2017 10:15 - 11:05 PST
Segal Room 1400

10:15 PST

"Table Talk" in Online Discussion Forums Using Marginalia, an Annotation Tool
Two cohorts of students in a small undergraduate course in Education posted structured responses to 7 course readings on Moodle discussion forums. They were also required to discuss each response posted by the other 2 or 3 members of their group. Students reported their asynchronous online conversations about course readings were more like small group face-to-face discussions, i.e. “table talk,” when they used Marginalia, an annotation tool, to make comments rather than “reply-ing” as they would in a threaded discussion. This was because comments appeared immediately to the right of the text that had caught their attention and were often followed by another. The goal of this project has been to investigate the types of comments and conversations students had in the margins to determine whether their interactions represented authentic conversations.  

Students’ comments were coded based on their role in the discussion (Brookfield & Preskill, 2005).  The 16 codes included questioning, answering, disagreeing, extending, acknowledging, and personalizing.   Tallies indicated that many students made connections between the content of the readings and their professional or personal lives, as they would have in face-to-face discussions.  They were supportive, asking and answering questions about the material, and occasionally challenging each other.  

Attendees will leave with an understanding of the ways in which these students used Marginalia to co-construct rich, shared meanings of the readings and generate questions prior to further extending their knowledge in class meetings. 


Monday November 6, 2017 10:15 - 11:20 PST
Breakout Room 1500

11:10 PST

Analysis of UFV Student Learning Patterns: Ratio of Instructor-Directed (In-Class) to Independent (Out-of-Class) Time Spent on Learning Activities
While notable research has examined how students spend their time outside of class, little of that research has focused on Canadian institutions, nor has it compared how the reported time spent varies according to the discipline or delivery method of specific courses. This session will highlight the key findings of a study of over 50 classes at the University of the Fraser Valley. The study asked students in a wide variety of courses and faculties to report on how much time they spent outside of class doing work for the course, and on how that time breaks down into various learning activities. The faculty members teaching these courses were also surveyed and asked to report on their expectations for student out-of-class work.

We will provide a full summary of the findings, including comparisons of time spent by program/faculty (e.g., Arts vs. Sciences), by delivery format (e.g., online vs. face-to-face), and by student year. Trends in the activity breakdown as reported by students will also be shared, as will differences between faculty expectations and student reports of time spent.

Participants will engage with the findings to discuss implications for pedagogy, program and course development, and potential policy changes at their own institutions. Key discussion questions include the following:
• How are the patterns in student reporting of time to complete various activities significant to curriculum development and pedagogy?
• How can the results of this study inform discussions about assigning course credits?
• What are possible implications for online, blended, and face-to-face course design?

Speakers
avatar for Samantha Pattridge

Samantha Pattridge

Department Head, Associate Professor, University of the Fraser Valley
UFV



Monday November 6, 2017 11:10 - 12:00 PST
Breakout Room 1500

11:10 PST

Connecting Scholarly Inquiry and Community of Practice: Three Approaches
Why and how do we pursue answers to puzzling pedagogical questions within a community of practice?

This session looks at three approaches to collaborative scholarly inquiry as alternatives to the research pursuits of the isolated individual faculty member. Within these approaches, commonalities include creating space for examining pedagogical questions together, with colleagues taking the role of critical friends, providing “alternative understanding and knowledge that will lead to deeper reflection on actions and inquiry into experience” (Pellerin, 2011).

Come learn about three approaches of collaborative scholarly inquiry and hear firsthand anecdotes of the challenges and opportunities of implementing these approaches from three different BC PSE institutions.

Speakers
avatar for Karen Densky

Karen Densky

Associate Teaching Professor/TESL Coordinator Faculty of Education and Social Work, Thompson Rivers University
Karen Densky holds a PhD in Education in Curriculum Theory and Implementation (Simon Fraser University) and an MA in Education in Curriculum and Instruction (Simon Fraser University). Her teaching areas are in English language and teacher education. Karen’s research areas include... Read More →
avatar for Carrie Nolan

Carrie Nolan

Dean of Learning Transformation, Northwest Community College
Having been recognized for being a Kickass Canadian (https://kickasscanadians.ca/carrie-nolan/), Carrie has a background in educational foundations (PhD University of New Hampshire) and experiential education (M.Sc. Minnesota State) and paddling, as she was part of the first female... Read More →


Monday November 6, 2017 11:10 - 12:00 PST
Segal Room 1430

11:10 PST

Using Learning Communities to Leverage Educational Success for Traditional and Non-Traditional Students
Student diversity is rising rapidly in post-secondary programs and students who come from non-traditional backgrounds (ESL, Indigenous, learning disabilities, mental health issues etc.) often face greater barriers to educational success than more traditional student groups.  Research suggests that using Universal Design Principles and Indigenous talking circles will help to establish strong ties between students, instructors and their institutions. This results in a supportive social and educational environment, which in turn, leads to better student retention and improved educational outcomes for all students. 

In this presentation, the research done for the Master's thesis "Together We Stand: Exploring Learning Communities in Trades Programs" will illustrate to what degree learning communities were present in trades programs at Vancouver Island University and what students thought about being a part of these communities.  Suggestions are offered for rapidly establishing healthy, constructive learning communities that will quickly draw all students into a vibrant cohort that will support each member to experience educational success.

Speakers
avatar for Rita Gower, M.Ed

Rita Gower, M.Ed

Instructor, Faculty of Trades and Applied Technology, Vancouver Island University
As an instructor in the Faculty of Trades and Applied Technology, I'm interested in teaching and learning methods that enhance cohort learning. I am also interested in improving outcomes for students who encounter difficulties during their post-secondary experience.


Monday November 6, 2017 11:10 - 12:00 PST
Segal Room 1420

11:10 PST

ePortfolios: A product and process: Connecting with Professional Competencies
ePortfolios are increasingly used in medical education (Belcher et all. 2014) and in professional programs in general to connect learning with professional competencies and to promote reflection, inquiry and integration for students Baston (2015). In the Dental Hygiene Degree Program (Faculty of Dentistry) at UBC e-portfolios were integrated into the curriculum in 2012 and since that time all undergraduate students have been assessed on their completion of an ePortfolio using the UBC Blogs (WordPress Platform)

Speakers
avatar for Lucas Wright

Lucas Wright

Open Strategist (Leave Appointment), BCcampus
UBC


Monday November 6, 2017 11:10 - 12:00 PST
Segal Room 1410

11:10 PST

First Class Exercises - Engaging Students on the First Day of Class
Many instructors miss the opportunity provided by the first class of a course to excite and engage students.  Some simply review course outlines and discuss expectations while others start with a lecture.  I have developed a practice of starting all my courses with fun exercises that challenge students and introduces them to many of the important concepts that will be covered during the term.    Student often have little exposure to the topics that will be covered in the subjects that I teach in supply chain management resulting in limited understanding of what to expect (Morris, 1997; Pal & Busing, 2008).  This creates an opportunity to creatively introduce the field.  While it is common in this field to include forms of active learning, such as simulations, games, and case studies, engaging students in such an activity on the first day is not common practice.A colleague and I have published one of these first-class exercises as a teaching brief (Snider & Southin, 2016); 92% of students surveyed enjoyed it. Students indicate that the exercise gives them insight into a topic with which they have little experience. Informal surveys in other courses appear to provide similar satisfaction ratings.While I use this practice in my field of supply chain management to try to get students engaged on the first day in a field to which they have limited exposure, I believe it could be used in many different disciplines to start the term off in a fun and engaging way.

Speakers
NS

Nancy Southin

Assistant Professor - School of Business and Economics, Thompson Rivers University


Monday November 6, 2017 11:10 - 12:00 PST
Fletcher Challenge Theatre (cap. 200)

12:00 PST

Lunch
Monday November 6, 2017 12:00 - 13:00 PST
TBA

13:00 PST

Increasing student motivation through democratization and personalization
Student learning outcomes are substantially affected by their motivation. Given that students often lack interest in “dry” mandatory courses, one challenge faced by instructors is to motivate engagement with course materials. This presentation reports on a successful approach to increasing student engagement by democratizing (Breen & Littlejohn, 2000; Ellis, 2013; McWilliams, 2015) and personalizing (Clarke, 1991) required writing classes.

UBC’s Arts Studies in Research and Writing (ASRW) teaches academic research and writing in courses that fulfil the Faculty of Arts Writing Requirement for a majority of UBC-Vancouver Arts students. These courses are structured to incorporate several factors that facilitate student learning – namely, “[a]cademic rigor, extensive writing assignments, plentiful opportunities for interaction with faculty, and participation in research” (Harrison & Risler, 2015, pp. 67-68). However, students often enter ASRW courses with low motivation, and some even defer taking them until the last possible opportunity before graduation.

During the 2016—2017 academic year, I democratized and personalized first-year and upper-level required courses, as well as a third-year elective English course—with a view to empowering students and, thereby, promoting engagement with course materials. In this presentation, I will describe my approach and report on my results, drawing out some of the similarities and differences between each student group. These results are drawn from both formal and informal student evaluations, as well as a pre and post-course survey of student attitudes to research and writing.

Participants will be encouraged to reflect on ways they might democratize and personalize their own courses.

Speakers
avatar for Kate Power

Kate Power

Instructor, UBC


Monday November 6, 2017 13:00 - 13:50 PST
Fletcher Challenge Theatre (cap. 200)

13:00 PST

Preparing Students for Active Engagement in Online and Blended Learning Environments
Are you grappling with how to prepare your students for success in online and blended programs at your institution? This session will provide you with an exemplar for preparing students for success via a comprehensive online orientation. Come learn from this case study that describes the design, development, implementation, and evaluation of the online orientation modules for new students at Royal Roads University. You will engage in intense discussions about the role of interaction and student engagement. Many educators point out the importance of interaction in high quality online education. For instance, Garrison and Shale (1990) state that interaction is “education at its most fundamental form” (p. 1). In addition, Palloff and Pratt (1999) argue that the “keys to the learning process are the interactions among students themselves, the interactions between faculty and students, and the collaboration in learning that results from these interactions” (p. 5). However, students need to be prepared for online interactions that include both the application of technical skills as well as the development of cognitive and meta-cognitive skills. Online orientation programs can aide in the development of these skills which prepares new students for active learning and success in their studies. 

Speakers
avatar for Sophia Palahicky

Sophia Palahicky

Associate Director, Centre for Teaching and Educational Technologies, Royal Roads University
Sophia holds a leadership role in CTET. She and her team of learning designers work with core and associate faculty to design and develop courses that promote social constructivist learning, team based learning, and collaborative learning as prescribed by the learning and teaching... Read More →


Monday November 6, 2017 13:00 - 13:50 PST
Segal Room 1400

13:00 PST

Preparing Students for the Future: Exploring TVET Instructors’ Perceptions that Shape their Pedagogical Decisions
The 21st Century TVET curriculum is currently in a complicated crossroads situation.  On one hand its transition from within is moving out from industrial to informational modes (Billett, 2001, Rose, 2000, Taylor, 2016). This shift, driven by modern workplace demands associated with fast paced changes in technology, is calling for a restructuring of vocationalism (Lucas, Spencer, & Claxton, 2002,). On the other hand, residing within the broader context of curriculum, TVET competes with other cultures and their influences on the curriculum from the outside.  Both transitions are happening simultaneously and have a potential impact on forming instructors’ curriculum choices in different ways (Joseph, 2011). 
Through the analysis of curricula, a co-existence of multiple curriculum cultures in the 21st Century is exposed, and as a consequence of the multiplicity, the cadre of instructors is also eclectic. Thus research questions arise in order to understand the current situation in British Columbia, and how instructors make their pedagogical choices based on their belief and value structures that are situated within a range of cultures.

Since the situation is complex, I have chosen a mixed methodology, Q-Methodology, for its strength in providing an objective measure of subjectivity (Ramlo, 2015). The focus of this Q-methodology study is situated in the post-secondary TVET arena within British Columbia. This study aims to focus on how instructors’ perceptions drive their decisions in determining the appropriateness of their chosen pedagogy, their beliefs about the effectiveness of their pedagogy, and their views regarding the future aims of TVET.



Speakers
avatar for Sally Vinden

Sally Vinden

Curriculum, Teaching & Learning Specialist, Vancouver Island University
Trades and Vocational Education and Training (TVET)Curriculum and Pedagogy International Development of TVET


Monday November 6, 2017 13:00 - 13:50 PST
Segal Room 1410

13:00 PST

Green-lighting feedback: Improving the effectiveness and efficiency of feedback on student writing
Providing feedback on student writing is an essential but time-consuming aspect of grading papers. Using the metaphor of a traffic light, this session will offer participants suggestions and resources for green-lighting feedback by improving the effectiveness and efficiency of feedback comments. Specifically, we will explain how collaborations between a faculty member and the Writing Centre resulted in more informative feedback and a more effective use of the instructor’s time while grading. We will outline factors that affect students’ interpretations of feedback (Cameron, Nairn, & Higgins, 2009; Duff, 2010; Hyland, 2013; Séror, 2009) and share resources developed to assist faculty members with providing written feedback.

After taking part in this session, it expected that the audience will be better able to:
• appreciate the impact of feedback on student writing;
• reflect more fully on the challenges associated with red-light and yellow-light feedback;
• understand key considerations for providing green-light feedback.


Speakers
avatar for Jo Axe

Jo Axe

Professor, School of Education and Technology, Royal Roads University
Royal Roads University
avatar for Theresa Bell

Theresa Bell

Writing Centre Manager, Royal Roads University


Monday November 6, 2017 13:00 - 13:50 PST
Segal Room 1420

13:00 PST

Inquiry and Research : A Community College Perspective
Camosun College places high value on teaching excellence and puts the  student experience at the centre of all it pursues. In contrast to universities, as a community college, Camosun is steeped in a commitment to applied learning and a culture of scholarship and research and its associated structures is not as central to its practices. This session will explore how Camosun College promotes evidence based approaches to evolve and enhance teaching practices outside of the typical approaches employed by universities.  The session will provide an opportunity for other colleges  and institutes that face similar structural and cultural challenges to learn how Camosun is moving towards a more intentional approach to inquiry and scholarship.  The presenters will: share how Camosun showcases exemplary teaching practices; detail the role of Innovation funds, managed by the President’s office,  in stimulating teaching innovation; reflect on the connection between applied research and curriculum; and the explore the emerging  policy work that will encourage  the scholarship of teaching and learning while encompassing an indigenous perspective to research.  Participants will be invited to share their college based practices and consideration will be given to how the conversation can continue beyond the symposium. 

Speakers
avatar for Jacquie Conway

Jacquie Conway

Faculty Development, Centre for Excellence in Teaching and Learning, Camosun College
avatar for Sybil Harrison

Sybil Harrison

Director Learning Services, Camosun College
Libraries, books, teaching and learning centres!


Monday November 6, 2017 13:00 - 13:50 PST
Breakout Room 1500

13:00 PST

Team "reading sprees" and comics: Awakening to Truth and Reconciliation
How do you get students who act as though they are "allergic" to reading to actually READ and UNDERSTAND the course material? How do you get students to lay aside their pre-existing biases and stereotypes and become more open to practicing principles of equality, diversity and social justice especially as they relate to Aboriginal history and issues? And how do you achieve all this in one 3-hour lesson? Learn how to adapt “team reading sprees" and student-created comics to subject matter where there is dense language and/or emotionally challenging content. Move hearts, open minds, meet learning outcomes—and have fun!

The reading sprees were successful because a single student might balk at the task of reading a 25-paged report, however, 25 students willingly read and offered a “teach back” on what they learned from a single page of that same report.

Truth and Reconciliation— overcoming resistance. Creating social justice graphic narratives and engaging in critical commentary helped students overcome normal, initial resistant to social justice theory, science and best practices. Our students were asked to illustrate concepts from the Truth and Reconciliation (T&R) report using stick figure drawings. The resulting student-created "comics" were assembled and the Truth and Reconciliation graphic narrative presented — students narrating their own images as they appeared. An examination of students “after” reflections revealed students had a deeper understanding of indigenous history and were more compassionate about challenges faced by Aboriginals than “before” the lesson began.

Monday November 6, 2017 13:00 - 13:50 PST
Segal Room 1430

13:55 PST

Does online peer evaluation lead to self-regulated learning? A faculty-led initiative to improve teaching & assessment in online/blended programs
The session explores the positive impact of well structured online peer evaluation on students’ ability to self-regulate their learning performance through a case study in a graduate business program.https://teachonline.ca/pockets-innovation/peer-evaluation-learning-and-assessment-strategy-school-business-simon-fraser-university-british

The questions which shaped our thinking in this project are:
  • How does peer evaluation strategy bridge learning and assessment in an online learning environment?
  • Do students perform better in online group projects when they give and receive constructive peer feedback?
The learning environment in business programs needs to be both knowledge-centered and learning-centered (Bransford et al 2000) because the repertoire of skills required to function optimally in small and large groups is acknowledged as a critical point in the learning trajectory in business education (Thomas 2016). A multi-layered learning assessment environment which is held together by an online peer evaluation component, designed on the logic of team-based learning (Michelson, Sweet, & Parmelee 2008) is central to the learning environment.  Our preliminary results show that students perform better in teams when they are held accountable for their contribution to group projects. Giving and receiving constructive feedback improves students’ ability to use rehearsal, elaboration and organizational strategies in group projects with increased skills for self regulation (Zimmermann 2000).

In this session, I will present two mini case studies. Using these as a general framework, participants work in small groups on a) the relevance of high impact assessment as lever for active learning b) the role of discipline-specific drivers in creating scafflding for self-regulation in online and blended programs.


Speakers
avatar for Ranga Venkatachary

Ranga Venkatachary

Simon Fraser University


Monday November 6, 2017 13:55 - 14:45 PST
Breakout Room 1500

13:55 PST

Learning the Ropes: Revealing Moments of Undergraduate Research Assistants’ Learning about Scholarship
Teaching students about research is an important focus of teaching and learning in higher education across disciplines and across contexts. As students proceed through undergraduate programs, they are asked to seek knowledge from various sources, assess the knowledge, and make connection between the information presented and their respective courses in their chosen discipline. Increasingly, universities and faculty realize the value of undergraduates not just reading about research in their courses, but actually learning how do conduct academic research and how research contributes to knowledge. However, as funding is scarce, these research assistant opportunities usually go to graduate students.  Literature speaks to various learning potentials graduate students enjoy from their roles as research assistants: some speak to the ethical obligation of a professor to a graduate research assistant (McGinn, Niemczyk, Saudelli, 2013); some speak to the role of mentoring in research assistantships; team work and collaboration (Hulse-Killacky & Robinson, 2005); and some speak to research identity and confidence (Niemczyk, 2010). The commonality is that all of these studies explore graduate research assistantships and all are in a North American context. Undergraduate research assistantships including international research assistantships as a pedagogical site for learning is an underexplored area of study regarding researcher learning potential. This research study is a multiple self-study of the research assistants and faculty mentors learning about scholarship through engaging as research assistants in a qualitative case study in 3 secondary schools in Qatar, the Middle East. The research question is: What is involved in mentoring international, undergraduate research assistantships in educational scholarship?

Speakers
avatar for Mary Gene Saudelli

Mary Gene Saudelli

Faculty, Teaching and Learning, University of the Fraser Valley
International and Indigenous higher education, curriculum, interdisciplinary studies, learning and teaching approaches, Scholarship of Teaching and Learning


Monday November 6, 2017 13:55 - 14:45 PST
Segal Room 1400

13:55 PST

Mapping educational leadership: Addressing the "what?" and "so what?" questions
Educational leadership in the teaching and learning mandate of institutions is expressed in different arenas, which include personal practice, Departmental and Faculty priorities, and institutional strategy (Aitken & Tateba, 2014). Though educational leadership incorporates notions of enhancement, innovation and influence, it is often conflated with activities relating to educational management and / or service in the area of teaching and learning (Hofmeyer, Sheingold, Klopper, & Warland, 2015).

In Canada, many institutions have teaching-focused roles and appointments which incorporate or require elements of educational leadership activity for promotion and career advancement (Bowness, 2016); yet there is often lack of clarity in what the term actually encompasses (Berkowicz & Myers, 2016). This session draws on recent work at UBC to re-conceptualize how we think about, identify, document, and establish the impact of educational leadership activities.
This session will engage participants in large and small group discussion, individual reflection, and a guided activity to map their educational leadership contributions.

By the end of this session, participants will be able to:
• Articulate a definition of educational leadership
• Begin to identify their own educational leadership activities and associated evidence via a mapping activity
• Describe sources of evidence of educational leadership
• Decide on next steps for documenting their educational leadership

Speakers

Monday November 6, 2017 13:55 - 14:45 PST
Fletcher Challenge Theatre (cap. 200)

13:55 PST

Images, speech balloons, and artful representation: Comics as visual narratives of early career teachers
This presentation describes our implementations of arts-based research outputs in the research area of teacher mentorship. We will discuss how the medium of comics is utilized as a form of arts-based knowledge mobilization activity to engage with early career teachers and educational professionals across school communities in British Columbia, Canada. This presentation aims to provide scholarly and artful portrayals of teacher narratives in the context of mentorship, which can be key to creating and sustaining strong and professional teaching. Our use of an arts-based research methodology in teacher mentorship aims to offer an alternative way of mobilizing the research knowledge, as well as to provoke artful representations in articulating the complexity of teacher mentorship. 

Speakers
avatar for Julian Lawrence

Julian Lawrence

Instructor/Lecturer, Emily Carr University of Art and Design
My work concentrates on the undercurrents of communication through gesture in the medium of comics. The research I undertake explores freehand narrative drawing and its impact on representations of artist identity. Investigations of these topics led me combine theories of authorship... Read More →


Monday November 6, 2017 13:55 - 14:45 PST
Segal Room 1410

13:55 PST

Team-Based Learning: Living our Model
Purpose: Building on the theme, Scholarly Teaching and Learning in Post-Secondary Education, this session provides reflections of team-based learning experiences and offers space to share ideas to maximize benefits and minimize barriers of team-based learning. This session will appeal to anyone seeking to improve their team-based processes and share their wisdom (from newbies to experts).
 
Outcomes: By the end of the session, participants will be:
• exposed to intentional team-based learning processes from Royal Roads     University (RRU);
• involved in idea generation in design, instruction or coaching; and
• inspired by team-based learning’s potential.
 
Presentation: RRU’s unique learning experience is backed by a well-developed, successful Learning and Teaching Model (RRU, 2013) and an innovative team coaching system. The Model embeds core components including outcomes-based, technology-enhanced, experiential and authentic, learning community, team-based, integrative, applied, engaged learning, action research, supportive and flexible. Focusing on teams, this presentation introduces the active inquiry into the successes and areas for improvement at RRU and shares insights from team coaching, intentional curriculum design and delivery of meaningful team processes. Data-gathering itself is team-based, participatory and engages knowledge-holders in active authentic processes.
 

Speakers
avatar for Trish Dyck

Trish Dyck

Manager of Team Coaching, Team Coach, Royal Roads University
Manager of Team Coaching at Royal Roads University (RRU). Team Coaching is a co-curricular support service at RRU offering team skill development, co-creation with instructors around team design/assessment, live team coaching, and mediation. I invite conversations on Team Based Learning... Read More →


Monday November 6, 2017 13:55 - 14:45 PST
Segal Room 1430

13:55 PST

Using the Talking Circle to Explore Indigenization of Teaching and Learning in Post-Secondary Education: Sharing Our Successes, Challenges, and Questions.
What does it mean to indigenize teaching and learning in post-secondary? How do I know if I’m doing it well? Why is indigenization suddenly an imperative?

For several years I have worked as a consultant and an adjunct professor supporting post-secondary instructors as they explore these questions. I often find there is a lack of background needed for understanding why indigenization is a critical social and political necessity in education. There is also a need for sharing ideas and anxieties concerning the process of indigenizing teaching and learning in the post-secondary classroom. Resistance to indigenization, as well as generalizations, is also a reality that persists.

This workshop operates on two levels, giving participants an experience of indigenized learning while imparting information. Instructors often misunderstand the issue, trying to approach it from a perspective of multiculturalism. From this lens, the purpose and importance of indigenizing teaching and learning is missed. The goal is to shift our point of view to more deeply grasp that aboriginal issues are actually everyone’s issues. We are all treaty people and this reality transcends knowing about and respecting an ‘other’ culture.

I will role model how an instructor can share their expertise with students by revising the one-way format of a lecture into a responsive conversation circle, where all voices are heard and acknowledged. Thus, the protocol of the longhouse will be animated – respect, reverence, relationship, and reciprocity. This workshop is not only about indigenizing education but an experience of indigenized teaching and learning itself.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Amie Wolf

Dr. Amie Wolf

Aboriginal University Bridging Chair, Vancouver Island University
Offering twenty-five years experience in Indigenous and decolonization education, I am the Aboriginal University Bridging Chair and sessional instructor in the Academic and Career Preparation Department at the VIU Nanaimo Campus.


Monday November 6, 2017 13:55 - 14:45 PST
Segal Room 1420

14:45 PST

Break
Monday November 6, 2017 14:45 - 15:00 PST
TBA

15:00 PST

Research Bites
Three minutes, three slides! Presenters will share a description of a scholarly teaching practice investigation, highlight informal or formal research findings, pose inquiry questions or seek feedback on a scholarly inquiry investigation. 

  1. Why and how students use electronics to enhance their learning (Ivona Mladenovic)
  2. Supporting Faculty Development in the Implementation of ePortolio: A Participatory Action Research Study. (Michelle Johnson)
  3. The Work of Learning (Bratislav Brad Mladenovic)
  4. Taking integrity to the gym: Practicing integrity, using the honour system and reducing cheating. (Jessica Motherwell)
  5. JIBC Library/Faculty Collaboration: Students’ Perception on the Development of Research Skills in an Applied Degree Program (Florence Daddey, Marjory Jardine)
  6. Bringing Teaching and Research Together: Assessing Scholars' Experiences Writing for CanLit Guides (Ceilidh Hart)
  7. Upside Down? The flipped classroom, cognitive load, and student expectations (Andrew Owen)
  8. From Adoptions to Zed Creds: The next phase of Open Education in BC (Rajiv Jhangiani)

Speakers
avatar for Florence Daddey

Florence Daddey

Centre for Teaching, Learning and Innovation, Justice Institute of BC
Florence is a Program Manager and Instructor and works for the Centre for Teaching, Learning and Innovation (CTLI) at the Justice Institute of BC. In her role as an instructional designer she collaborates with program areas and divisions as they develop and redesign their courses... Read More →
avatar for Marjory Jardine

Marjory Jardine

Marjory completed her Bachelor of Arts (Psychology) at the University of Victoria and completed her Master of Library Science at UBC. She has worked as a librarian in the forest products industry, health care, and, post-secondary education. After completing the B.C. Provincial Instructor... Read More →
avatar for Rajiv Jhangiani

Rajiv Jhangiani

Open Studies Teaching Fellow & Psychology Professor, BCcampus
I am the University Teaching Fellow in Open Studies and a Psychology Professor at Kwantlen Polytechnic University in Vancouver, BC, where I conduct research in open education and the scholarship of teaching and learning. I also serve as the Senior Open Education Advocacy & Research... Read More →
avatar for Michelle Johnson

Michelle Johnson

Educational Developer, University of the Fraser Valley
Michelle Johnson is an Educational Developer and part of the Teaching and Learning team at the University of the Fraser Valley. She has a background in Graphic Design and customer service. She is currently working towards two goals: a Masters in Learning and Technology and the implementation... Read More →
BM

Bratislav Mladenovic

Simon Fraser University
avatar for Jessica Motherwell

Jessica Motherwell

Research Associate, Justice Institute of BC
Director, Education Consultant, Instructor, Tutoring servicesLife Outside the Box Learning InstituteCreating small comics to tell BIG stories Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice


Monday November 6, 2017 15:00 - 15:35 PST
Fletcher Challenge Theatre (cap. 200)

15:35 PST

Closing Remarks, Prize Draws
Monday November 6, 2017 15:35 - 16:00 PST
Fletcher Challenge Theatre (cap. 200)